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Author Topic: Daisy Mae Doberman  (Read 1081 times)

cabutts0924

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Daisy Mae Doberman
« on: August 16, 2013, 01:03:48 AM »

I am so glad to have stumbled upon this site. Our doberman is almost 4 years old and was just diagnoised with Blasto. She started August 6th with lethargy, anorexia and fever. I thought it was because a foster dog we had was adopted out and she missed him. I live in Carol Stream, Il and I am curious how many other dogs in the area have been affected. We did a chem pannel and eveything looked good. that night we bathed daisy to bring the fever down and thought it would help with the irritation of her skin (we thought it was allergic reaction). she had a wound on her neck pus and bleed everywhere. back to the vet the 7th. started clavamox to cover both skin and lung possible infection. tested thyroid and gave anti-inflamatory drug. perked up from the anti inflammatory pills. Once completed 11th stopped eating again and very lethargic- 12th back to vet d/t fever 105. did xray and blasto angigen elisa urine, did cytology of neck wound which hadnt healed yet. given prednison and rx for itraconazole. told not to start prednisone until 3 days between last rimidayl dose and itra started. also picked up pepcid to start. Recieved SUBQ fluids. still febrile. by 0200 at the emergency vet- another x ray. fine needle bx of the right lymph node (shoulder area) which is suddenly huge. (had 1 dose of the itra in by now).
13th noticed stiff when walking. eating a little bit. lethargic.

It is now the 15th. Daisy eats about one good meal a day. shoving the pills down her throat. vet said continue the clavamox to combat any pneumonia (bacterial) that can start from the dying of the spores with the blasto. started prednisone 14th. She is now drinking water like crazy- no longer febrile but is leaking everywhere because she cant hold her urine. walking around much easier. the wound on her neck is almost healed and the lymph node swelling is decreasing.

I have read that day 5-7 are the worst after starting treatment in terms of respiratory problems popping up once the spores die. so far  no eye symptoms but have not seen much about this in what I have found to read. anyone know when the highest risk of sudden blindess starts? Really hoping that since we have no fever and she is eating 1 -2 (yesterday) meals we are on the mend. afraid to get my hopes up though. have requested IV antifungal treatment from vet and emergency specialist bc i dont want to lose her and would spend the money now. they dont think her case needs it. I dont want to be the low chance that she did and we didnt do anything.
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Faith

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2013, 03:15:26 AM »

This site has helped so many.   Sophie started squinting mildly and notice if your dog bumps into anything.  That's the side you focus on first.   For us it was between 8-12 days after the start of treatment.  Wish vets would automatically do eye pressure checks during the initial visit.  Visited the office 3 x in the first week of diagnosis.  Visiting a specialist is recommended.  We were on a regiment of drops on top of all the meds in the beginning.  The option to remove the eye is because of blasto infection and that's the last place it will disappear.  Sophie had corneal abrasion, blindness, retinal detachment due to blasto being in her eye.  Avoid running for the first couple of months especially during the start up treatment.   Wish we only did 10-15 minute leash walks at least 1x / day in the beginning.  The initial 7-10 days of building up protection is crucial.  Our latest visit her corneal abrasion is diminishing.  We visit every 6-8 weeks for a quick check.  Would prefer other dogs/cats avoid this path.

The are quite a few dogs in Illinois that have been diagnosed with Blasto.  Far west as Mississippi River, north to the Wisconsin border, and east into Chicago itself.  As for the suburbs there are a few.  Usually its a couple cases per vet office.  Heard of cases in Central almost to Southern IL.  We knew exactly where our girl got it.  At a park that tore down a whole bunch of trees last fall.  Dogs in our neighborhood have died.  So far Sophie is the only one making it in my area that I'm aware of.   We share her story that Blasto can be fought.  Recently met another dog owner from a nearby town whose dog beat Blasto 2 years back and is still free of it.  Great inspiration.   
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cabutts0924

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2013, 04:08:52 AM »

 ;D
So nice to hear some success stories. I keep reading all the horror stories and it breaks my heart. This dog is like our child. she gets ice cream on her birthday (vanilla) and plain mc donalds cheese burgers after crappy vet visits that include shots. I am a nurse and the only reason she is already on treatment is because I pushed our vet and told him my nurses gut was screaming at me that something was terribly wrong ( a week before the confirmation by cytology). I appreciate the information reguarding eye pressures. I will question the vet in the am when he calls (they have been checking in daily on her)
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Faith

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2013, 08:14:26 AM »

Sleepless nights are a norm during the initial battles against Blasto.  A roller coaster of symptoms may arise.  Be ready < being a nurse you all ready have that skill>.   Rest when you can for you are a vital key.  Felt as if I called my vet daily.  So grateful for their kindness ,their insight to listen to my concern, and willingness to learn more.  Because of their skill and the open communication between us they were able to counteract the symptoms quickly while targeting Blasto.  The eye specialist has been amazing.  Recall him silently waiting while we made our decision.  He honored our choice with reservation but her eye pressure was checked constantly once we chose the drop route.  We took a HUGE risk there < chose the path rarely traveled>.  Prayer groups were helping us too.  Your intuition is the best guide.  That was how I got through that initial month which felt like a year.  You are not alone.  Feel free to ask questions.  Those here kept my sanity and gave me the knowledge needed to get this far for they truly understand this love. 
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cabutts0924

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2013, 11:22:24 AM »

my vet said he could check the eye pressure and would if it would give us peace of mind. Why was checking the eye pressure a huge risk? and why were they checked constantly? I would assume start eye drops and check the pressure at a given interval (I have no experience with eyes so i wouldnt even know how frewuently to want them checked. did this path less traveled pay off? did your pup have elevated pressures and you avoided retinal detachment?
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cabutts0924

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2013, 11:54:49 AM »

ok I am paranoid. decided screw it $73 for peace of mind to check her eyes now. the left one is tearing more than normal and that nurses gut says something is off with the eyes even though I cant put a finger on it. $73 is nothing compared to everything else and for a dog that isnt even 4 years old- ten years with the potential lose of vision is worth the money spent- especially since she still hasnt dealt with kids and we want to start a family in the next year. I cant imagine never being around a child and then not being able to see one that is playing roughly with you.

Anyones pup have incontience issues with itra? I am going to ask about soy isoflavons the doberman rescue group I am a part of recommended it cuz dobes are prone to it and our pup has had minor issues since spay but since the intra started she is saturating her dog bed, the couch, our bed (Thank God for pee covers!) and if she is gonna be on itra for a long time- I want to find something that can at least make it more manageable. She has ALWAYS slept with us- either on the couch or in the bed (She sneaks up when we are sleeping) my poor husband woke up 3 times wet last night. he is totally understanding that it isnt her fault but I have a hard time thinking he will be so understanding 6 months from now.

Def noticing a change in her breathing pattern today. nothing extremely labored or fast. mid 20's but her cheeks seem to puff up. I dont really have an idea what accessory muscle use would look like in a dog except for a pant but from what I have read when counting respiration the pants dont really count so if anyone can shed some light on early signs the breathing is starting to go the wrong way I would appreciate it. I feel like by the time her respiration s hit 50 or her refill in her mouth is prolonged the window to get her to the appropriate help is very narrow. The VSC which does critical care and has seen her and has a documented + fine needle aspiration is approx 30-45 minutes away and while there we saw a family rush their boxer in not breathing. hearing them ask if the family wanted CPR done was the hardest thing for me to even fathom. At work its a given 90% of the time, I have NEVER thought about it for my pup and DEF do not want to get anywhere near that point. I would rather admit her for oxygen therapy for a week than monitor early signs for a prolonged period of time at home.

My only other general question is this: is there anything when your pup was first diagnosed that you wish someone had told you to ask the vet or check. A lab or diet supplement. Any one piece of information that if you had known would have made a difference for your pup be it either outcome or complications long term.

(If you cannot tell I am anal retentive both with my own patients in their care and apparently with my furry baby too). my motto is I would rather look stupid and annoy someone with the knowledge than learn the hard way or wish I had questioned something more.

Thank you so much for the feedback. Just finding this board is such a weight off my shoulders. I can see I am not the only one with a million questions to bug my vet or constantly milling over possible places she could have sniffed up this terrible spore in hopes of avoiding EVER doing it again. If I could put her in a hazmat suit I would.
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Faith

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2013, 10:35:29 AM »

When we first had her eye pressure check after noticing a mild cloud like film in her eye it was 52 by my vet < 11 days after treatment started>.  We already saw the squinting and noticed her bump into walls a couple times 1-2 days prior < 8-10 days after treatment started>.  Two days later into the specialist it was 55 < 13 days after treatment started>.  That quick rise in pressure since the initial diagnosis caused the retinal detachment, corneal abrasion, blindness, and glaucoma.  The insided eyelid in our Lab tore as her exterior eyelid swelled shortly after almost to the size slightly larger than of a golf ball.   Sophie looked like she just came out of a boxing match.  Choosing to keep the eye in was the Huge Risk.   We were blessed with luck for the outcome surprised not only our vet but the eye specialist too.  Honestly, against such severe odds the power of prayer really helped us.  The infected eye pressure was last measured at "0".  Healthy eye at " 5 ".   Due for another check soon < 6-8week increments >.

For breathing... palpitate the lungs as if you are treating Cystic Fibrosis.   Address the respiration challenge like that for hands on help.  Remain calm and peaceful.  Our dogs really know us more than we know ourselves. 

Milk thistle has been used by some of us.  It helps the liver.   Intra filters more so through the liver I think.  Flucon filters through the kidneys.
Ask < phone call > your vet prior to adding on any herb.  When Sophie started eating slower I started feeding with a spoon to add extra 1/4 to 1/2 cup of food per mealtime.  Somewhat like we do at Thanksgiving Feast < 5 lbs weight gain >..... lol... well I gain that.   Try a pumpkin.. canned pumpkin works too.. add it to their meal or on its own.   Apple Cider Vinegar With Mother < cloud film in base of bottle >.    55 lb Sophie takes an easy 1-2 TBS / meal or in water bowl fill.  All of us have other success routes this was part of mine.   
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Barbj

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2013, 11:19:06 AM »

I didn't have breathing dificulties with Annie, but lots did, and were given prednisone.  And if I remember correctly, prednisone makes you consume lots of water.  So isn't that why she's urinating so much?  Hopefully, as her breathing evens out eventually, she'll be dropping the pred.  Good luck.  Barb
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cabutts0924

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2013, 07:00:11 PM »

Urine elisa is 5.9. I can't find a reference range but remember seeing one on here last week when reading thru stuff. Can anyone point me in the right direction
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Faith

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2013, 09:58:52 PM »

Sophie's Mira Vista result 3 months ago was 11.2 or 11.4 < something in that area >.  She just had her test sent out today for the 3 month check. 
Our goal is to drop down to " 0 ".   We were probably way off the chart in the high range when she was first diagnosed per our Vet.
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fourlocos

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2013, 10:28:43 PM »

I was surprised to read about your dog Daisy Mae.  I live in Carol Stream IL.  I don't have a Blasto dog thankfully but my dear friend does.  In fact I have several friends with dogs that have it, are finished with treatment or have passed from it.  It has hit DuPage County much harder than people know.  My friends dog is nearing the end of his treatment and having lost his sight for a while has regained quite a bit of it.  There is a great eye doctor in Glendale Heights who is treating many Blasto eye problems should you need it.  She is wonderful.  When her dog was diagnosed we knew the symptoms having been through it several years ago with another dog park friend's dog.  He lost his sight in both eyes.  But recovered.  Even then when her dog had the fever and cough, it didn't click!  My goal was to tell everyone and anyone what to watch for in hopes they will get treatment sooner from their vet.  I dread fall coming because I know we will see an increase in cases.  Our dog park is in the woods.  Near the river.  And they dug it up to put trails in which added to our risks.  But sporting breeds have to have the woods, the water and the freedom to run free and work a field.  Quality of life is important and with that now comes risks.  Our first gut reaction was to not go anymore.  Then what?  Live in a bubble with an unhappy but safe dog.  Or do we let them be dogs and do what they are bred to do which is work the birds and play and run.  It's a horrible thing to have to decide.  I wish the best for your dog.  Private message me if you would like to ask anything.  My friend has helped many with this journey and would be happy to help you.  She lives in Winfield. 
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wiscnorthwind

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Re: Daisy Mae Doberman
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2013, 12:12:03 AM »

The reference range for the urine antigen test is listed on the MiraVista report...I ALWAYS get copies of any labwork I have done. (Each of my dogs has their own 3 ring binder so I can keep all of their records straight.)

Here's the information from the MiraVista reports...

Reference Interval: None Detected
Results reported as ng/mL in 0.2-14/7ng/mL range
Results above the limit of detection, but below 0.2ng/mL are reported as 'Positive, Below the Limit of Quantification'
Results above 14.7ng/mL are reported as 'Positive, Above the Limit of Quantification'.
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